A Zebra’s Unique Sound from the African Savannah

African Savannah 1622923365
africa, elephant, nature @ Pixabay

What does a zebra sound like? Well, the answer to that question is not what it may seem. The first thing you may think of is a horse neighing or maybe even an elephant trumpeting. But what about a zebra? Zebra’s make their own unique sound from the African savannah!

The most common misconception about zebras is that they have stripes on them like other animals with spots. However, all zebras are born without any markings whatsoever; as time goes by, black stripes appear which become more prominent until they fully cover the animal in adulthood. Zebras can be either white, brown, or black.

The sound that zebras make is a moo-like noise that sounds like “maa.” They also make what’s known as an “inquiry call,” which is made during the breeding season to attract mates and signal their presence in order to find other zebras with whom they can mate.

Zebras live on open grassy plains, lightly wooded savannahs, thorn scrublands, semi deserts located within Africa south of the Sahara Desert; specifically Botswana (home to over 70% of all wild Zebras), Namibia (40%), South Africa (30%) and Tanzania (25%).

Zebras are social animals that live in herds. They have a matriarchal society, meaning the females and their young dominate herd life while males only associate with groups to mate or as bachelor “bachelors.” The bulls (males) can be quite aggressive towards humans and other zebras when trying to protect its territory from intruders. In addition, zebra’s stripes provide an effective camouflage against predators such as lions.

The wild population of Zebras is considered stable overall; however, localized vulnerability has been caused by significant losses in Tanzania due to hunting for meat and habitat loss through competition with domestic livestock for food sources- specifically land cleared over decades for new cattle farming practices – which might affect the population.

It is likely that human interference will continue into wild zebra territory as humans have proven themselves time and again as predators who hunt for sport- whether it’s legal or not – and cattle farming practices could become unsustainable when there is less land available for grazing livestock such as cows or goats. So while we should worry about protecting the habitats from overgrazing by domestic animals and the effects of global warming, we should also worry about what roads lead to the extinction of their wild population.

What sound does a zebra make?

A Zebra’s unique sound can be heard on the African savannah. But what do they really say? That question has been up for debate since their first appearance in 1879 as “striped horses” with “a noise like heavy breathing”. With no formal scientific research to back it, many people and scientists have attempted to answer this curious thing of science. So while we should worry about protecting the habitats from overgrazing by domestic animals and the effects of global warming, we should also worry about what roads lead to extinction- whether it is intentional or not. The long-form content adds a paragraph introducing how Zebra are at risk for extinction.

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By Ethan Devid

Pop culture fan. Zombie enthusiast. Avid twitteraholic. Certified coffee trailblazer. Bacon expert.

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