What is Included in the NIMS Management Characteristic of Accountability?

NIMS Management
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Individual Accountability: an individual, or single person is accountable for their actions or inaction which resulted in possible consequences and may have been judged by a jury to be guilty of committing a crime (statute) before sentencing takes place. Criminal justice personnel are also held accountable for their criminal acts committed while working at a correctional facility. Individual accountability has three parts- culpability, responsibility and ability to answer. Culpability refers to whether someone behaved recklessly, negligently or intentionally. Responsibility means that people need not intend harm but they must take reasonable measures so that others might not suffer injury as the result of our own behavior. Ability to answer means being able to describe what happened from one’s own perspective and as the result of one’s own behavior.

Accountability can take many forms and may include individual, group or institutional accountability depending on which area you are discussing. There might also be a need for external accountability if there is an investigation by a third party outside of your institution such as law enforcement or members from another organization who will report progress back to their home office about what they find out during the investigation. The different types of accountability depend on why someone needs it- whether because people have been harmed or property has been damaged, but also related to how much authority they have over others and where decisions get made (individual, group, institutional).

Accountability is a core pillar of the NIMS Management Characteristic. People need to be held accountable for not following proper procedures which could lead to harm or damage in order to make sure that this problem doesn’t happen again. Institutions and groups also need accountability because they are responsible for their employees as well as suppliers who might work with them on projects. Accountability can take many forms depending on what area you’re discussing but it’s important in all areas- whether individual, group or institutional- where decisions get made relating to how much authority people have over others (individuals) and where decisions get made about an incident (group/institutional).”

The different types of accountability depend on why someone needs it and to whom it needs to be accountable.

One type is individual responsibility which takes the form of personal accountability for one’s actions in relation with others (i.e., being held responsible as an individual). People need this if they are going into a position where they have no formal authority but still want people around them who will take their suggestions seriously- like a motivational speaker or consultant, for example.”

Individuals also need accountability when making decisions about an incident – for instance, after something has happened that might lead some people involved to question whether they followed appropriate protocols or not. Accountability can help ensure that things stay fair and transparent even when there may be concerns that things might not have been done properly.

Individuals also need accountability when making decisions about an incident – for instance, after something has happened that might lead some people involved to question whether they followed appropriate protocols or not. Accountability can help ensure that things stay fair and balanced.”

Accountability can also be applied to a workplace setting. For example, an employee might take on accountability for the work they do and their ability to complete it in the allotted time frame as agreed upon with their employer. In this case, accountability is shown by meeting deadlines or agreeing to get back on track if something unexpected occurs which delays progress.”

“The NIMS Management Characteristic of Accountability includes many aspects that seem very basic yet are regularly encountered in organizational settings such as: Personal Responsibility, Decision Making After an Incident Occurs (or Anytime), Accepting Criticism or Feedback – Allowing Others To Correct Errors Made By Yourself Or Those Around You… As Well As Engaging In The Process Of Problem Solving With Others.”

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By Ethan Devid

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