What you see vs What she sees: The Differences in how Males and Females Learn

Males and Females
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As a society, we have come to accept that males and females learn differently. For years, the conversation has been focused on how girls are more emotional learners while boys are more physical learners. However, recent research suggests that this may not be the case anymore- in fact, it’s just as important to know what she sees as what he does!

For years, the conversation has been focused on how girls are more emotional learners while boys are more physical learners. However, recent research suggests that this may not be the case anymore- in fact, it’s just as important to know what she sees as what he does!

In a study of over 200 children between 12 and 14 months old by researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, they found that gender differences were minimal when it came to learning language skills (including expressive vocabulary). The difference was seen only in one area: “exploratory play.” In other words: While there is no significant evidence for males being better at reading or writing than females; there is some evidence showing male superiority when it comes to spatial

In a study of over 200 children between 12 and 14 months old by researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, they found that gender differences were minimal when it came to learning language skills (including expressive vocabulary). The difference was seen only in one area: “exploratory play.” In other words: While there is no significant evidence for males being better at reading or writing than females; there is some evidence showing male superiority when it comes to spatial tasks.

In a study, published in the journal “Science” in 2011, researchers from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management and Bar-Ilan University concluded that female students had better working memory skills than males when they were tested on two tasks: spatial rotation (such as drawing or pointing to what they might see if they looked out their window) and verbal recall (reciting words read aloud). There was no significant difference between genders when it came to short term memory skills.

How do Males and Females Learn Differently?

Different research studies have found different results about whether men are better at certain subjects than women; however, there is one area where male superiority has been consistently shown: Spatial tasks. In general, females score better than males on verbal tests, while males perform better in spatial tasks.

This disparity may be due to hard-wired differences between the brains of men and women: Men’s brains have more connections within hemispheres (half of the brain), making it easier for them to process information spatially; Women’s brains are more connected from hemisphere to hemisphere, which makes processing verbally much faster.

How can Parents Share these Differences with their Children?

Parents should share what they see vs what she sees when teaching children about the world around them at a young age so that kids will know how each gender perceives things differently – even if those perceptions change as they grow older.

What You See vs What She Sees: The Differences in how Males and Females Learn

Posted on November 26 2016 by Meghan March

Education is not just about what you see, but also what she sees. This article discusses the differences between males and females when it comes to learning tasks that are more verbal or spatial in nature. It compares their strengths and weaknesses with education methods such as hands-on activities for each gender – so parents can share these insights with children at a young age to ensure they know how boys learn differently than girls do, even if those perceptions change over time. Let’s dive into the findings of this study!

Verbal Tests On Verbal Tests, while males perform better in spatial tasks (i.e. their ability to remember objects in a room), females perform better when the task is verbal (i.e. remembering words). For example, males are more likely to have dyslexia or difficulty with reading because they tend not be strong at letter recognition – while girls might struggle in math unless it’s presented visually by hands-on tasks and manipulatives instead of numbers on a page.

Female Males On Spatial Tasks Females excel as spatial learners, so even if male students learn quickly how best to do something through speech alone, female students will need visual aids like charts and diagrams before understanding what needs done next. This can lead them up being frustrated since learning doesn’t come intuitively for them without hard evidence that what was just said is what they’re supposed to do. Males, on the other hand, are stronger at processing information through speech and articulate themselves better verbally than females in general.

Male Females On Verbal Tasks Female students will experience more difficulty with verbal tasks – like remembering words when reading aloud or writing a list of sentences without adding numbers into it (i.e., “I have five cats”) because their brains process language differently from males’. Women’s brains work primarily in an auditory way while men tend to be better equipped for interpreting visual cues as well as nonverbal communication such as gestures and facial expressions

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By Ethan Devid

Pop culture fan. Zombie enthusiast. Avid twitteraholic. Certified coffee trailblazer. Bacon expert.

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