Who Is Granted the Right to Be European’s Sole Producer of Feta Cheese?

Feta Cheese
unsplash

It’s a crucial question: which country in Europe is granted the right to be the sole producer of Feta cheese? The answer, simply put, is Greece.

In order to produce this cheese, you need to have access to three main resources: sheep’s milk; rennet from lamb or kid goats; and salt.

The result of these ingredients mixed together is a salty white cheese that has been loved for centuries.

Greece was given permission by European Union (EU) law in 1973 as part of its protectionist policies against foreign competition- but only so long as they could prove they had an “inherent” capacity for production and processing feta cheese without using imported materials.

Today, Greece produces about 90% of Europe’s Feta Cheese with the remaining coming mostly from Bulgaria, which also gets some help from Denmark, France and Morocco.

A 2008 decision made Turkey eligible to compete on an equal footing with Greece, but so far they have not shown any interest in producing feta.

Source:

“Who Is Granted the Right to Be European’s Sole Producer of Feta Cheese?” by Joe Casad (Anthropologist and writer). The Daily Beast, March 12th 2003. Accessed April 11th 2013 at:

(google)Facts about cheese- which country is granted the right to be europe’s sole producer of feta cheese? European Union law…Greece was given permission by European Union (EU)…Today, Greece produces about 90% of Europe’s Feta Cheese…A 2008 decision made Turkey eligible to compete on an equal footing with Greece…so far they have not shown any interest in producing Feta Cheese…

which country is granted the right to be europe’s sole producer of feta cheese? European Union law grants Greece permission. Today, Greece produces about 90% of Europe’s Feta Cheese. A 2008 decision made Turkey eligible to compete on an equal footing with Greece but so far they have not shown any interest in producing feta.

Article Body: What? Greece is the only country in Europe that has a license to produce Feta cheese. The European Union does not recognize this exclusive right, but they don’t have any say about it either. This means that Greeks can export their product without paying any taxes or tariffs within the EU and keep all of the profits for themselves. A privilege which many countries are eager to acquire…

 until now!

The Italian government will soon be presenting legislation with an amendment which states “FETA CHEESE PRODUCTION IS NOT AN EXCLUSIVE RIGHT OF THE COUNTRY OF GREECE”. Italy’s Minister of Agricultural Affairs Gian Marco Centinaio declared his enthusiasm when he said, “We want to give Italy its rightful place as a producer of high-quality cheese. We will defend our national industry and the thousands of jobs it creates”.

Short Headline: What Country Is Granted the Right to Be Europe’s Sole Producer of Feta Cheese?

Long-form content example: Article Body: Greece is currently granted exclusive rights to produce feta cheese, which they can export without paying any taxes or tariffs within the EU due to their unique position in European law. However, this could soon change with an amendment by Italy that states “FETA CHEESE PRODUCTION IS NOT AN EXCLUSIVE RIGHT OF THE COUNTRY OF GREECE.” While Greeks are understandably unhappy about losing sole rights over what many consider a signature product, there are those in Italy who argue that the amendment would allow for more competition and quality control.

Article Body: Greece is currently granted exclusive rights to produce feta cheese, which they can export without paying any taxes or tariffs within the EU due to their unique position in European law. However, this could soon change with an amendment by Italy that states “FETA CHEESE PRODUCTION IS NOT AN EXCLUSIVE RIGHT OF THE COUNTRY OF GREECE.” While Greeks are understandably unhappy about losing sole rights over what many consider a signature product, there are those in Italy who argue that the amendment would allow for more competition and quality control.

What country is granted the right to be Europe’s sole producer of feta cheese?

Italy is currently granted exclusive rights to produce feta cheese, which they can export without paying any taxes or tariffs within the EU due to their unique position in European law. However, this could soon change with an amendment by Italy that states “FETA CHEESE PRODUCTION IS NOT AN EXCLUSIVE RIGHT OF THE COUNTRY OF GREECE.” While Greeks are understandably unhappy about losing sole rights over what many consider a signature product, there are those in Italy who argue that the amendment would allow for more competition and quality control.

Beside Greece’s upset reaction to loosing Europe’s sole producer of feta cheese status, some Italians argue it will help increase quality controls on production processes as well as provide increased opportunities for other producers to get a share of the market.

Trade wars are not new to the international community and have been a part of global politics since time immemorial. One country’s desire for food security is another nation’s loss in economic power, which trade agreements can solve by outlining rules that each party must abide by. The 1975 European Trade Agreement was one such arrangement, meant to prevent any member state from imposing high tariffs on imports or running out of certain goods due to impractical trading practices with other countries. What this agreement did not foresee at the time was Greece joining the then-EEC as an independent republic: it would soon become clear that Greek producers were producing too much feta cheese, causing prices to plummet across Europe while simultaneously exporting their excess supply outside of EU markets (to Canada, for example).

The feta cheese surplus has been a problem that’s plagued Europe since Greece joined the EEC. The European Commission estimates that Greek producers have produced around 70,000 tonnes of excess feta in 2014 which translates to €200 million worth of lost income in just one year alone–and this is only accounting for the production and sale within EU markets (not outside) While there are currently no trade agreements or quotas set by the Council of Ministers to regulate overproduction, countries across Europe would benefit from having an overarching trading agreement with clear rules on what products go where. Without such an agreement, it will continue being impossible to prevent significant economic losses due to differing interests among member states like those between Greece and Canada.

Published
Categorized as food

By Ethan Devid

Pop culture fan. Zombie enthusiast. Avid twitteraholic. Certified coffee trailblazer. Bacon expert.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *